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Posts Tagged ‘Eliud Kipchoge’

NIA Grand Prix 2-mile indoors

 

This will be the first in a series of highlights from the 2012 season.

There are many things that make something a highlight, and with any series like this you leave out more than you include. But that’s no reason not to do it. Let’s relish in the performances we loved from the year.

 

Mo

 

Saturday 18 February

 

Without the promise of a world cross country champs in March, the powers that be having decided it was more suited to a biannual championship –  a shame in my opinion – the first real highlight of the early year elite distance running scene was Mo’s 2 mile race indoors in the Birmingham Grand Prix.

 

There’s no bias with it being in Birmingham, it was simply the first time he was lined up against some real competition, in the year when it ALL mattered. The Olympic year.

 

How was he doing? How had winter training gone? Was he handling the pressure of being world 5k champion and favourite to win the 5 and 10 in London? Everyone was itching to see him in action. Birmingham provided the platform.

 

The grand prix in Birmingham has been regarded as the biggest indoor meeting in the world for a number of years. The entry lists are always strong and this year was no different. Mo was up against Tariku Bekele, perennial high quality performer Eliud Kipchoge and Moses Kipsiro, with pacing by Remmy Limo and Gideon Gathimba. In addition there was domestic British interest in Johnny Mellor toeing the line as well. He might not have been contesting for the win, but the fact that he was lining up against these guys was an indication of how far he had come and the fantastic form he had been showing in recent times.

 

galen 2 mile ARA week before this race, there had been another 2 mile race, in the US. Mo’s training partner Galen Rupp had run an incredibly strong and almost entirely solo 8:09.72 for the win and the American record. Since they had been training together Mo was expected to be in similar shape. Galen had taken the record from Bernard Lagat incidentally, who was in the Birmingham meeting, but was running the 1500m. If there is one thing Bernie (and his coach James Li) know how to do, it is shape a season. Starting out with a 1500 instead of going head to head with your main Olympic 5k rival is a sensible decision both from a racing position and from a training position. Sharpen up with some under distance races early season.

 

Back to the 2 mile race. The race was touted as being Mo’s attempt on the long standing British record (8:17 John Mayock) as well as the 39-year old European record (8:13.2 Emile Puttemans). But in reality these records didn’t mean much. They were sugar coating on the cake of the actual race. What the fans wanted to see was Mo versus the guys on the track. The guys who could challenge, push and perhaps beat him. The race got underway and the pace was brisk. The world record was never going to be troubled, but Gathimba took them through the opening mile in 4:04 so there were no passengers. Arne Gabius from Germany was running an incredibly courageous race and was hanging onto everything he could. He really stood up that day.

 

midrace 1Once the final few laps approached, the contenders shuffled around trying to position themselves to stick in the winning strike for home. The last lap burn up was just that and coming off the final bend Mo, Eliud, Tariku and Kipsiro were covered in that invisible blanket cliché. Eliud Kipchoge has a history of starting seasons well so it should probably not have been too surprising that he held the others off for the win. Mo managed second with Kipsiro and Bekele third and fourth. Less than a second separated them.

 

2 MILES – Men   OFFICIAL RESULTS
1 Eliud Kipchoge KEN 8:07.39 PB
2 Mo Farah GBR 8:08.07 NR
3 Moses Kipsiro UGA 8:08.16 NR
4 Tariku Bekele ETH 8:08.27 PB
5 Arne Gabius GER 8:10.78 PB
6 Jonathan Mellor GBR 8:40.50 PB

 

 

Finishing in 8:08.07, Mo had broken the British record and the European record. He had also bested his training partner by a second. But tellingly he hadn’t won the race. The media naturally chose to run with that story. What happened Mo? Where was the kick Mo? Are you overtraining Mo? The usual none-too-deekipchoge win 2p journalistic type inquisitions that they think the public wants to read about. (Perhaps the public do want to read that kind of stuff, who am I to know?)

 

Fact is, all keen fans of distance running had seen what they wanted to see. A strong Mo kicking hard and racing hard. The fact that he had been edged out was neither here nor there. This was February. It didn’t matter. It matters in August. In many ways, being beaten here in his first high profile race and in his home country, may have been a good thing. When is getting beaten a good thing? Well, when it takes some of the pressure from an expectant public off your shoulders it is a good thing. And when it shows the world that just because you won the 5000m world champs the year before, it doesn’t mean the rest of the professional distance running world are simply going to hand you wins. They will race you even harder, and want to beat you even more. It showed everyone that winning in August was going to be tough. But it also showed everyone that Mo had trained well over the winter and was in a great position (possibly the perfect position) leading into the transition from indoor to outdoor season. He was up for the challenge.

 

The running year was underway. The unavoidable conveyor belt to the Olympics had begun. This 2 mile race cracked open the 2012 distance season, and what a season it turned out to be.

 

Were we sure that Mo could do the double? No. But by gosh we knew we were in for an exciting ride.

 

Footnote: Lagat didn’t win his 1500m, but ran 3:36 and probably got what he needed from it. A month later he went to world indoors and won the 3000m gold medal.

Footnote 2: Johnny Mellor held on for an 8:40.5 Personal Best. Great run Johnny.

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